Question

a- You have 200 g of coffee at 45 0C, Coffee has the same specific heat...

a- You have 200 g of coffee at 45 0C, Coffee has the same specific heat as water. How much ice at -10 0C do you need to add in order to reduce the coffee’s temperature to 30 0

b- A laboratory technician drops a 0.06 kg sample of unknown solid material, at a temperature of 100 0C, into a calorimeter. The calorimeter can, initially at 19 0C, is made of 0.2 kg of copper and contains 0.15 kg of water. The final temperature of the calorimeter can, and content is 250 Compute the specific heat of the sample.

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