Question

1. When a solid dissolves in water, heat may be evolved or absorbed. The heat of...

1.

When a solid dissolves in water, heat may be evolved or absorbed. The heat of dissolution (dissolving) can be determined using a coffee cup calorimeter.

In the laboratory a general chemistry student finds that when 6.20 g of CsClO4(s) are dissolved in 115.60 g of water, the temperature of the solution drops from 22.87 to 19.50 °C.

Based on the student's observation, calculate the enthalpy of dissolution of CsClO4(s) in kJ/mol.

Assume the specific heat of the solution is equal to the specific heat of water.

ΔHdissolution =  kJ/mol

2.

When a solid dissolves in water, heat may be evolved or absorbed. The heat of dissolution (dissolving) can be determined using a coffee cup calorimeter.

In the laboratory a general chemistry student finds that when 20.92 g of BaBr2(s) are dissolved in 111.60 g of water, the temperature of the solution increases from 22.47 to 25.54 °C.

Based on the student's observation, calculate the enthalpy of dissolution of BaBr2(s) in kJ/mol.

Assume the specific heat of the solution is equal to the specific heat of water.

ΔHdissolution =  kJ/mol

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