Question

This is no data for this question Argue in general whether we can have probability of...

This is no data for this question

Argue in general whether we can have probability of 1.0 (or 0.0) of any future event

a. First, using a frequentist interpretation of probability

b. Secondly, using Bayesian interpretation of probability

Homework Answers

Answer #1

a) Using frequentist interpretation:

The probability of any future event can be 0 on 1.

1. If the event is an impossible event then chances of its occurrence are 0 (e.g. The probability of getting a number greater than 6, when a die is thrown once)

2. If the event is n certain event then chances of its occurrence are 1.(e.g. The Christmas will be celebrated on the 25th December of this year)

But mostly the probability lies between 0 and 1.

b) Using Bayesian interpretation:

Similar is the case here as well.

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