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The angular momentum of Tanya Harding’s triple axel? Calculate the angular velocity and angular momentum of...

The angular momentum of Tanya Harding’s triple axel?

Calculate the angular velocity and angular momentum of Tanya while she is in midair during the first two jumps (triple lutz and triple axel)

a)calculate the angular velocity and angular momentum of Tanya while she is in midair during the jump. Note that triple here implies three revolutions

During the jump, Tanya pulls her arms in, so to find her moment of inertia we can approximate her shape as a solid cylinder. To find the diameter of the cylinder, you can use the average shoulder width of an American woman

3revolution = 6pie

mass= 48kg

hight=155cm

average shoulder =35.3cm

time for the first jump= 0.0865sec

b)The second jump is the triple axel, calculate the angular velocity and the angular momentum for this second jump.

time for the second jump= 0.0801sec

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