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An electron beam with energy 0.1 eV is incident on a potential barrier with energy 10...

An electron beam with energy 0.1 eV is incident on a potential barrier with energy 10 eV and width 20 ˚A. Choose the variant that you think best describes the probability of finding an electron on the other side of the barrier: a) 0; b) <10%; c) 100% d) 200%.

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