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Helmholtz coils. Sometimes experimenters need to produce a magnetic field that is constant over some region...

Helmholtz coils. Sometimes experimenters need to produce a magnetic field that is constant over some region of space, without wrapping a long straight solenoid around the experiment. Here’s a good way to do that. a. Show that the magnetic field a distance z along the axis of a circular conducting loop with radius a and current I is

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