Question

Describe some of the key features of the multi-payer and single payer health systems in the...

Describe some of the key features of the multi-payer and single payer health systems in the United Kingdom and Canada. What are the similarities and differences between them? How are they different than the multipayer US system?

Describe some methods or approaches that might be taken to control rising costs and improve the quality of care?

Homework Answers

Answer #1

A Multipayer system, by contrast, allows multiple entities (e.g., insurance companies) to collect and pay for those services.When looking to our global counterparts, the single-payer system in some rich economies (Germany, the Netherlands, and Switzerland) allows people to enroll in multiple insurance plans that are run by both private companies and non-profit organizations. Other countries, such as the United Kingdom, have government both run hospitals and employ physicians. Each system is the result of numerous iterations and a long evolution.Multiple payer refers to a health system that is financed through more than a single entity, one of which may include government. ... Whether a health care system is single or multiple payer does not in and of itself define the system in terms of coverage.Highly regulated, universal,multi-payer health insurance systems are illustrated by countrieslike Germany and France, which have universal health insurance via non-profit “sickness funds” or “social insurance funds”.Multi-payer systems may be better able to collect revenues in countries with a weak taxation system, and can limit the amount of government control over revenue collection. Health insurers pool revenues to protect indivi- duals from the financial risks associated with the use of medical services.Multiple payer refers to a health system that is financed through more than a single entity, one of which may include government. Private health insurance companies participate in multiple-payer systems, with financing through individual premiums paid directly by beneficiaries, employers, and, in some cases, government.Whether a health care system is single or multiple payer does not in and of itself define the system in terms of coverage. Universal coverage means simply that all people within a particular jurisdiction have health insurance, be it single or multiple payer. Universal coverage requires governmental mandate; however, the form of that mandate may be through either single or multiple payer or a hybrid model.Health care in the United States is currently a unique hybrid, multiple-payer system, but with elements of single payer (i.e., Medicare, although beneficiaries also contribute through premiums), publicly subsidized private payers (e.g., employer-sponsored health insurance), socialized medicine (e.g., Department of Veterans Affairs, in which government is both the payer and the employer), and self-pay (i.e., out of pocket).Political Accommodations in Multipayer Health Care Systems: Implications for the United States,” Tuohy provides additional perspectives on definitions while examining the history and current state of multiple-payer systems.

Single-payer healthcare is a type of universal healthcare in which the costs of essential healthcare for all residents are covered by a single public system (hence 'single-payer').

Single-payer systems may contract for healthcare services from private organizations (as is the case in Canada) or may own and employ healthcare resources and personnel (as is the case in the United Kingdom). "Single-payer" describes the mechanism by which healthcare is paid for by a single public authority, not a private authority, nor a mix of both.Several nations worldwide have single-payer health insurance programs. These programs generally provide some form of universal healthcare, which is implemented in a variety of ways. In some cases doctors are employed and hospitals are run by the government, such as in the UK or Spain.Alternatively, the government may purchase healthcare services from outside organizations, such as the approach taken in Canada.

Healthcare in Canada is delivered through a publicly funded healthcare system, which is mostly free at the point of use and has most services provided by private entities.The system was established by the provisions of the Canada Health Act of 1984.The government assures the quality of care through federal standards. The government does not participate in day-to-day care or collect any information about an individual's health, which remains confidential between a person and their physician.Canada's provincially based Medicare systems are cost-effective partly because of their administrative simplicity. In each province, every doctor handles the insurance claim against the provincial insurer. There is no need for the person who accesses healthcare to be involved in billing and reclaim. Private insurance represents a minimal part of the overall system.In general, costs are paid through funding from income taxes. A health card is issued by the Provincial Ministry of Health to each individual who enrolls for the program and everyone receives the same level of care.There is no need for a variety of plans because virtually all essential basic care is covered, including maternity and infertility problems. Depending on the province, dental and vision care may not be covered but are often insured by employers through private companies. In some provinces, private supplemental plans are available for those who desire private rooms if they are hospitalized.Cosmetic surgery and some forms of elective surgery are not considered essential care and are generally not covered. These can be paid out-of-pocket or through private insurers. Health coverage is not affected by loss or change of jobs, and there are no lifetime limits or exclusions for pre-existing conditions.Pharmaceutical medications are covered by public funds or through employment-based private insurance.Drug prices are negotiated with suppliers by the federal government to control costs. Family physicians (often known as general practitioners or GPs in Canada) are chosen by individuals. If a patient wishes to see a specialist or is counseled to see a specialist, a referral can be made by a GP.Canadians do wait for some treatments and diagnostic services. Survey data shows that the median wait time to see a special physician is a little over four weeks with 89.5% waiting less than three months. The median wait time for diagnostic services such as MRI and CAT scans is two weeks, with 86.4% waiting less than three months.The median wait time for surgery is four weeks, with 82.2% waiting less than three months.While physician income initially boomed after the implementation of a single-payer program, a reduction in physician salaries followed, which many feared would be a long-term result of government-run healthcare. However, by the beginning of the 21st century, medical professionals were again among Canada's top earners.

2) Single-payer system promotes equity, while multipayer system may be superior in efficiency enhancement.

Multipayer
system carries higher running costs, while a single-payer system may be exploited under a hostile government. No differences in quality of care were identified between the two types.
3) single-payer system of healthcare is where a single entity is responsible for collecting the funds that pay for healthcare on behalf of an entire population. A multi-payer system, by contrast, allows multiple entities (e.g., insurance companies) to collect and pay for those services.Single payer refers to a health system that is financed by a single entity; in its common usage, that single entity is government.Multiple payer refers to a health system that is financed through more than a single entity, one of which may include government.

3) U.S. healthcare could save more than $600 billion in administrative costs by adopting a single-payer system like neighboring Canada, a new study suggests.
The U.S.’s current multi-payer system cost the country $812 billion in administrative costs in 2017—four times more than Canada, which has a single-payer system—mostly due to the increasing overhead of private insurers, according to a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine.The study concluded that cutting U.S. administrative costs to Canadian levels by adopting single-payer health financing would have saved more than $600 billion.The study could provide ammunition to proponents who are advocating for a change to a single-payer system, such as so-called "Medicare For All," which is being touted by some Democratic presidential candidates, including senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Bernie Sanders of Vermont.The idea is controversial, and some candidates have now backed away from Medicare for All and are advocating for a public option plan that keeps the current system of private insurers and makes Medicare available to those who want it.But one of the study researchers said that option won’t cut costs the way a single-payer system would.“The U.S. can afford a Medicare-for-All program that would cover everyone and eliminate copayments and deductibles, but only if we transfer the $600 billion now wasted on excess administration to clinical care,” said study author Steffie Woolhandler, M.D., a practicing primary care doctor, a professor at City University of New York at Hunter College and a lecturer at Harvard Medical School, in an email to FierceHealthcare.


1. Save Money on Medicines.
2. Use Your Benefits.
3. Plan Ahead for Urgent and Emergency Care.
4. Ask About Outpatient Facilities.
5. Choose In-Network Health Care Providers.
6. Take Care of Your Health.
7. Choose a Health Plan That is Right for You.
8. Use a Health Care Savings Account (HSA) or Flexible Spending Account (FSA)
five steps primary careproviders can take right now to improve quality healthcare for their patients:
1. Collect Data and Analyze Patient Outcomes.
2. Set Goals and Commit to Ongoing Evaluation.
3. Improve Access to Care.
4. Focus on Patient Engagement.
5. Connect and Collaborate With Other Organizations.

Know the answer?
Your Answer:

Post as a guest

Your Name:

What's your source?

Earn Coins

Coins can be redeemed for fabulous gifts.

Not the answer you're looking for?
Ask your own homework help question
Similar Questions
In simple terms, describe some of the key features of the multi-payer and single payer health...
In simple terms, describe some of the key features of the multi-payer and single payer health systems in the United Kingdom and Canada. What are the similarities and differences between them? How are they different than the multipayer US system? In simple terms, describe some methods or approaches that might be taken to control rising costs and improve the quality of care?
After listening to this podcast, list and discuss the safe injection practices you should follow to...
After listening to this podcast, list and discuss the safe injection practices you should follow to prevent causing harm. Protecting Patients from Unsafe Injections: What Every Provider Needs to Know [Announcer] This program is presented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [Joyanna Wendt] Hello. I’m Dr. Joyanna Wendt, a Medical Officer at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, and today we’re talking about injection safety. I know some of you are thinking, “That’s so basic....
Reflect back on your draft. Reread it. Analyze it. What are the strengths of your draft?...
Reflect back on your draft. Reread it. Analyze it. What are the strengths of your draft? What areas will need improvement? The Treatment of Special Needs Children Abstract            Special needs children are still on the receiving end of abuse despite the increased clamor against their mistreatment. Also, they are likely to face discrimination and abuse in their homes and their social spheres; they have limited opportunities for quality education and can find trouble getting adequate medical assistance. The management of...
What is Medicare Part C? Provides the aged with home health care Provides the aged with...
What is Medicare Part C? Provides the aged with home health care Provides the aged with prescription drugs Enables low-income aged to participate in Medicaid Provides a voluntary managed care option for the aged How is Medicaid financed? It is financed entirely by the federal government. It is financed entirely by the state. States receive the same percentage of federal support. States with lower per capita incomes receive a greater percentage of federal support If a healthcare system is "free"...
Brian Durkee/ Director of Operations, Numi Organic Tea: Well Numi; Numi’s is a triple bottom line...
Brian Durkee/ Director of Operations, Numi Organic Tea: Well Numi; Numi’s is a triple bottom line company which means our focuses are on people, planet and profit. Hi, I’m Brian Durkee. I’m the director of operations for Numi Organic Tea and a big part of my role at Numi is to really manage that, and uh; it’s beyond just taking care of your employees. Numi has fifty employees in the U.S. but the peoples who dedicate the majority of their...
The questions to answer regarding the case material are as follows: Company overview . How the...
The questions to answer regarding the case material are as follows: Company overview . How the company uses its own products or services to enhance the total compensation for its employees. The internal strengths and weaknesses you identified and how the company responded to these factors from a total rewards perspective. The external opportunities and threats you identified and how the company responded to these factors from a total rewards perspective. Examples of traditional and non-traditional rewards and how they...
provide 3-4 paragraphs post (team 2) 1-What are 4 key things you learned about the topic...
provide 3-4 paragraphs post (team 2) 1-What are 4 key things you learned about the topic from reading their paper? 2-How does the topic relate to you and your current or past job? 3-Critique the paper in terms of the organization and quality.1- Employee Stress and how it has an Adverse Effect on a Company This paper explores employee stress and how it has an adverse effect on a company, its employees and the organization. Job stress can have a...
The Business Case for Agility “The battle is not always to the strongest, nor the race...
The Business Case for Agility “The battle is not always to the strongest, nor the race to the swiftest, but that’s the way to bet ’em!”  —C. Morgan Cofer In This Chapter This chapter discusses the business case for Agility, presenting six benefits for teams and the enterprise. It also describes a financial model that shows why incremental development works. Takeaways Agility is not just about the team. There are product-management, project-management, and technical issues beyond the team’s control. Lean-Agile provides...
Funding an IS project through a Chargeback method involves: Pricing the IS service out for the...
Funding an IS project through a Chargeback method involves: Pricing the IS service out for the customer buying the end product Direct billing by the firm for IS resources or services to the department that uses them Direct billing by the manager of a function for IS resources or services to an employee that uses them An accounting process that reduces tax liability for capital investments All of the following are attributes of considering IS costs as Overhead except the...
Please review the following below and provide , one-page reaction to this budget proposal. 1. Budget...
Please review the following below and provide , one-page reaction to this budget proposal. 1. Budget The President’s Budget and Health Care While the president’s budget is not likely to be acted upon by Congress, it does signal what the administration’s priorities are—as well as what policy initiatives they might push. Repeal the Affordable Care Act: The administration’s budget includes a plan that is based upon the plan put forward by Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Bill Cassidy (R-LA) last...
ADVERTISEMENT
Need Online Homework Help?

Get Answers For Free
Most questions answered within 1 hours.

Ask a Question
ADVERTISEMENT