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Suppose p is a positive prime integer and k is an integer satisfying 1 ≤ k...

Suppose p is a positive prime integer and k is an integer satisfying 1 ≤ k ≤ p − 1. Prove that p divides p!/ (k! (p-k)!).

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Answer #1

Above rule applicable of all types of natural number (not just for the prime numbers)

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