Aging Martial Artist? Related Questions

Aging Martial Artist?
Asked By endo,Last Answer By samuraiwarrior_98 At 2011.03,1 Answers

Im at a weird point in my training. I am getting older and my knees and shoulders are starting to wear out. Like everyone else that's trained for several years I have a ton of old injuries. I also am no where near as "Hard Core" as I was several years ago when I started training. I am having trouble finding a school that trains hard, but not crazy hard or that isn't a Mcdojo joke. What do you older martial artists do when your body needs a change of pace?

What makes a martial artist a good martial artist?
Asked By clown(s) around,Last Answer By Katana172 version3 At 2011.03,1 Answers

Bruce Lee is widely discussed on this forum and some claim him to one of the best and others ar not fond of him at all.

What is the measure of a GOOD martial artist?

Best answer will go to most logical and clear cut answer whether or not I agree.

Disclaimer: This is not a question about Bruce Lee!

"Martial artist should only fight martial artist" Do u feel the same way?
Asked By Kevin,Last Answer By Keyboard Warrior At 2011.05,1 Answers

I know me and one other person believe this, but how many others do

This mainly explains how i felt in my previous question(for those who answered), because i had been fighting my fellow martial artist for 8 years thats all i really knew. Moving to Alabama restricts me of fighting without trouble..

Why are you a martial artist? I'd like to know what motivates people to study the martial arts?
Asked By tigertom2k,Last Answer By Ken C At 2011.03,1 Answers

Are you into martial arts because you like to fight, are competitive or enjoy tournaments, or bouts?
Is it fitness and health that motivates you?
Is it spiritual?
Do you want to be able to defend yourself and others?
Is it because you like to be a showman and entertain others?
Perhaps you're artistic and enjoy perfecting the techniques of your chosen style?
Or is it a way for you to maintain self-discipline and a sense of control and personal strength, achievement or self worth in your life?

I'm genuinely interested and would value your honesty. Thanks.

A what point is a practitioner of the martial arts a martial artist?
Asked By J,Last Answer By Patrick At 2011.03,1 Answers

This isn't as simple an answer as some might believe, or have you to believe. The very term 'artist' means "a person who is skilled at some activity".
The Japanese word for martial artist is Budoka (武道家). Budo (武道) meaning "martial way" (武 alone having strong connections towards meaning 'to stop violence') and ka (家) means (as a suffix) a professional or an expert. In Japanese, a Budoka is an expert in the way of stopping violence. [Insert Tao reference here]

So all in all, by definition this should eliminate any sort of beginner. Anyone new to the martial arts could never call themselves a martial artist. But when? At what point does one become what could be considered skilled or an expert? Does it simply mean being well versed, or just a step above the rest?

How do you judge a martial artist?
Asked By Someone You Know,Last Answer By pugpaws2 At 2011.03,1 Answers

Some people attribute martial artists with being in great physical shape. Would you think less of a martial artist's ability because of his appearance (looks, weight, etc.)?

How do you top contributors judge other martial artists?
Do you look at their physical appearance? Do you look at their strength? How do you tell if they're any good?

What makes a martial artist?
Asked By clown(s) around,Last Answer By nwohioguy At 2011.03,1 Answers

Is it how long a person has trained or what and where they have trained? Is there something more than this? Do they have to know certain techniques or have studied under certain masters or in a certain country?

Make your answers as long or short as you see fit. I will pick the most comprehensive and logical answer as best answer whether or not I agree.

How would you rank yourself as a martial artist?
Asked By Metro Fashions,Last Answer By mttkd At 2011.03,1 Answers

Would you say you are more of a fighter, a traditioanalist, an innovator, and also aside from your school ranking what belt would you give your self.

Signs of an inexperienced martial artist?
Asked By Rambo220,Last Answer By nwohioguy At 2011.03,1 Answers

What do you think shows that a martial artist is experienced? Such as questions of which martial art is better?, or bragging in person. Stuff like that. I would like to hear your opinions.

I want to be a powerful programmer/martial artist?
Asked By Lucy Furr,Last Answer By rakunishu At 2011.03,1 Answers

do you think this is possible and or probable

Martial artist ever get the urge to fight?
Asked By Anti Thesis,Last Answer By kempo_jujitsu77 At 2011.03,1 Answers

We train for years on how to fight, we bash our bodies and get bruised all in the name of combat. We dedicate our lives to learn to defend ourselves while knowing that the best way to win a fight is to avoid it.

However, do any of you ever get the urge to fight? The urge to utilize the skills you have been building on for years? Do you ever get curious as to how your skills would pan out?

What if you die and never know what your abilities can do? I'm not talking about sports fighting, I'm talking about testing your skills on the street.

At times, it feels like I have a million dollars, but can't spend it. Anyone ever feel this way?

Martial Artist's New Years Resolutions?
Asked By jamesf24,Last Answer By marksamurai5 At 2011.03,1 Answers

January is almost over.

I'm curious as to what kinds of New Resolutions have been made by our martial arts community?

We all have our personal life related goals and resolutions, but I am curious about resolutions specifically related to your martial arts training.

My training resolution for 2009 is to be able to do the full side splits, Van Damme style. I have about 9" to go.

James

In your opinion, what makes a martial artist a "master"?
Asked By J,Last Answer By pugpaws2 At 2011.03,1 Answers

I've been thinking of this for several months now. I know a lot of people are hung up on rank but the intelligent of you know that means next to nothing. But where does knowledge and experience come to meet into what's perceived as a "mastery level"? The ability to effortlessly defend yourself? The ability to always have something to teach no matter the situation? Or a required amount of experience to finally be where you want to be in your study, training and/or art?

I keep thinking of knowledge and experience, but knowledge and experience in what form? Experience as in attending class regularly and learning from someone who has had generations of lessons taught to them, or experience as a constant personal battle to improve developed on your own.
Same with knowledge; something your told and taught, or something self realized and from your own cognition? I think I already now the answer to knowledge, but I want your take on it.

How do you perceive and describe a "master" level outside of belts, ranks and formalities?
(And I'm talking about you, not what someone else or tradition would say)

Was Gen Choi Hong hi a skilled martial artist ?
Asked By Paul D,Last Answer By David E At 2011.05,1 Answers

Philosophically speaking, do you believe the true role of the Martial artist is?
Asked By markell l,Last Answer By rumpletweezer319860604 At 2011.03,1 Answers

to conquer their limits physically, mentally, spiritually, to reach another mental plane? I mean there isn't another activity that truly incorporates such a dynamic splicing of physical, mental, spiritual development in my opinion. I personally feel that those of us who are in fact drawn to martial arts, innately, have chosen to take on a metaphysical task of showing how one could possibly surpass the normal limits of the human mind.

Im drawing this idea from a thought i had some time ago. legs were created to walk, to move around, (maybe)... and within the capabilies of the legs...we are able to use its functions to either run, kick, swim, etc...now one cannot argue that even though these actions aren't necessarily intended actions of the leg, we are in fact able to use them as such...in such a way that these actions contribute to the "over all good" of humanity. To me, I believe that in taking this fact alone, we may say that legs were, indeed, intended to be used as such...(simply because of the existence of such possibility) maybe we could furthermore say that in the future it is possible that we as humans will come up with new ways of using our legs that will ultimately add to the "over all" good of humanity.

Now if we put that into context with martial arts...what is your thoughts?

I hope I didnt loose you...

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